NES GADOL: A GREAT MIRACLE                          RECIPES

TALAK TAEMER

OUR LETTER    OUR JOURNEY    ABOUT ETHIOPIA    RECIPES    BLOG    PHOTOS    VIDEO    WISH LIST       

 
INJERA - AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN BREAD:
Ingredients
1 1/2 cups ground teff (180 g)                    salt, to taste
2 cups water                                            vegetable oil, for the skillet

Directions
Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour. This may take as long as 3 days, although some have had success with an overnight fermentation. The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter. Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste.

Lightly oil an 8 or 9 inch skillet (or a larger one if you like): Heat over medium heat.
Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet. About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air. This is the classic French method for very thin crepes. Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes.

Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan. Do not let it brown, and don’t flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side. Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don’t stick together.

INJERA - AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN BREAD:

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups ground teff (180 g)                    salt, to taste
2 cups water                                            vegetable oil, for the skillet

Directions
Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour. This may take as long as 3 days, although some have had success with an overnight fermentation. The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter. Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste.


Lightly oil an 8 or 9 inch skillet (or a larger one if you like): Heat over medium heat.

Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet. About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air. This is the classic French method for very thin crepes. Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes.


Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan. Do not let it brown, and don’t flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side. Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don’t stick together.

BERBERE:
1 tsp ginger                    1 tsp ground cardamom
1/2 tsp ground coriander 1 tsp ground fenugreek
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg    1/8 tsp ground cloves
1/8 tsp ground cinnamon 1/8 tsp ground allspice
2 tbs salt                        2 cup paprika
2 tbs ground cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
2 tbs finely chopped onions 
1 tbs minced garlic
1-1/2 cup water

In a cast-iron skillet, toast the ginger, cardamom, coriander, fenugreek, nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon, and allspice over low heat. Do not burn; this should only take a minute or so. Set aside to cool.
Combine the spices, onions, garlic, 1 tablespoon of the salt, and 3 tablespoons water in a small jar of a blender and blend until smooth.Combine the paprika, cayenne pepper, black pepper, and the remaining tablespoon of salt in the skillet and toast over low heat for a minute or so. Stir in the water, 1/4 cup at a time. Then stir in the blended mixture. Stirring vigorously, cook over the lowest possible heat for 10-15 minutes.
Transfer the berbere to a jar, packing it in tightly. Let the paste cook to room temperature, then cover with a film of oil. Store in the refrigerator between use.

BERBERE:

1 tsp ginger                    1 tsp ground cardamom
1/2 tsp ground coriander 1 tsp ground fenugreek
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg    1/8 tsp ground cloves
1/8 tsp ground cinnamon 1/8 tsp ground allspice
2 tbs salt                        2 cup paprika
2 tbs ground cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
2 tbs finely chopped onions

1 tbs minced garlic

1-1/2 cup water


In a cast-iron skillet, toast the ginger, cardamom, coriander, fenugreek, nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon, and allspice over low heat. Do not burn; this should only take a minute or so. Set aside to cool.

Combine the spices, onions, garlic, 1 tablespoon of the salt, and 3 tablespoons water in a small jar of a blender and blend until smooth.Combine the paprika, cayenne pepper, black pepper, and the remaining tablespoon of salt in the skillet and toast over low heat for a minute or so. Stir in the water, 1/4 cup at a time. Then stir in the blended mixture. Stirring vigorously, cook over the lowest possible heat for 10-15 minutes.

Transfer the berbere to a jar, packing it in tightly. Let the paste cook to room temperature, then cover with a film of oil. Store in the refrigerator between use.

YEMISIR KIK WOT (SPLIT LENTIL STEW):
Ingredients
1lb Red Lentils
Onion
2 1/2 Tablespoons Berbere (very spicy so if you don’t want too spicy use 2)
1 Cup Olive Oil
Garlic
Ginger
Water

Directions:
Chop Onion and cook until brownish - keep water. Add Berbere and simmer for about 5 minutes continuously stirring. Add one cup of olive oil. and stir. Add a little fresh garlic and ginger. Keep stirring and add 5 cups of water. Bring to boil.
Separately wash the lentils really well until the water is completely clear. Add Lentil to the berbere and keep stirring until it is soft and ready.
Serve with Injera
Makes 4 servings

YEMISIR KIK WOT (SPLIT LENTIL STEW):

Ingredients

1lb Red Lentils
Onion

2 1/2 Tablespoons Berbere (very spicy so if you don’t want too spicy use 2)

1 Cup Olive Oil

Garlic

Ginger

Water

Directions:
Chop Onion and cook until brownish - keep water. Add Berbere and simmer for about 5 minutes continuously stirring. Add one cup of olive oil. and stir. Add a little fresh garlic and ginger. Keep stirring and add 5 cups of water. Bring to boil.

Separately wash the lentils really well until the water is completely clear. Add Lentil to the berbere and keep stirring until it is soft and ready.

Serve with Injera

Makes 4 servings

THE ART OF ETHIOPIAN COOKING:
The Ethiopian meal is characterized by the ritual of breaking injera (traditional bread) and sharing food from a common plate, signifying the bonds of loyalty and friendship. Injera, a thin, spongy, fermented flatbread, is used in place of utensils and the traditional way of eating is with your fingers.
A Mesob is the straw woven tabletop on which food is traditionally served. Just before the food is served, a basin of water and soap is brought out for washing one’s hands.
Goorsha is an act of friendship. A person uses his or her right hand to strip off a piece of injera, roll it in the Wat, a traditional Ethiopian stew dish or a traditional dip and then put the rolled injera into a friend’s mouth. This is called a goorsha and the larger the goorsha, the stronger the friendship.
Two necessary elements of Ethiopian cooking are called Berbere and Niter Kebbeh. Berbere is a red paste made up of a multitude of spices and herbs. Niter Kebbeh is flavored butter with onions, garlic, ginger, and spices. When this prepared butter, called Niter Kebbeh, melts in your pan, it transports you to a land far away. 
Much of Ethiopian cooking is vegetarian. There are certain days of the week where only vegetarian food is eaten. 
Ethiopian drinks are made from local ingredients. Tej is an ancient honey-based wine that often initiates a meal. Talla is a beer made from local grain that often accompanies a snack of nuts or crackers. And, of course, coffee finishes off a traditional meal, sweetened with honey.

THE ART OF ETHIOPIAN COOKING:

The Ethiopian meal is characterized by the ritual of breaking injera (traditional bread) and sharing food from a common plate, signifying the bonds of loyalty and friendship. Injera, a thin, spongy, fermented flatbread, is used in place of utensils and the traditional way of eating is with your fingers.

A Mesob is the straw woven tabletop on which food is traditionally served. Just before the food is served, a basin of water and soap is brought out for washing one’s hands.

Goorsha is an act of friendship. A person uses his or her right hand to strip off a piece of injera, roll it in the Wat, a traditional Ethiopian stew dish or a traditional dip and then put the rolled injera into a friend’s mouth. This is called a goorsha and the larger the goorsha, the stronger the friendship.

Two necessary elements of Ethiopian cooking are called Berbere and Niter Kebbeh. Berbere is a red paste made up of a multitude of spices and herbs. Niter Kebbeh is flavored butter with onions, garlic, ginger, and spices. When this prepared butter, called Niter Kebbeh, melts in your pan, it transports you to a land far away.

Much of Ethiopian cooking is vegetarian. There are certain days of the week where only vegetarian food is eaten.

Ethiopian drinks are made from local ingredients. Tej is an ancient honey-based wine that often initiates a meal. Talla is a beer made from local grain that often accompanies a snack of nuts or crackers. And, of course, coffee finishes off a traditional meal, sweetened with honey.

BUTECHA - PUREED CHICKPEA:
1 chopped onion
Jalapeno pepper
3 cloves chopped garlic
1 juice of lemon
½ cup olive oil
salt to taste
1 cup cooked chick peas

Pureed chickpeas seasoned with red onions, garlic, jalapeno pepper, olive oil, lemon juice & fresh herbs. 
Served chilled

BUTECHA - PUREED CHICKPEA:

1 chopped onion

Jalapeno pepper

3 cloves chopped garlic

1 juice of lemon

½ cup olive oil

salt to taste

1 cup cooked chick peas


Pureed chickpeas seasoned with red onions, garlic, jalapeno pepper, olive oil, lemon juice & fresh herbs.
Served chilled

HOW TO BREW ETHIOPIAN COFFEE 
Ground Ethiopian Style
Bring 1 cup of water to boil
Add 2 Tbsp coffee
Keep boiling until the foam disappears
Let grinds settle
Add honey

Serve in Ethiopian Coffee Cup

HOW TO BREW ETHIOPIAN COFFEE

Ground Ethiopian Style
Bring 1 cup of water to boil
Add 2 Tbsp coffee
Keep boiling until the foam disappears
Let grinds settle
Add honey


Serve in Ethiopian Coffee Cup